Category Words, Mistakes

Pairs/Groups Of Words Often Confused – Part 4 of 6

Words, Mistakes

Pairs/Groups Of Words Often Confused – Part 4 of 6

by: Laraine Anne Barker

LATER, LATTER

Later means afterwards; latter is the second of two things.

“Later that day we went for a walk.”

“We have two choices. The latter is the more reliable, but the former would be cheaper.”
LAY, LAID

This pair confuses writers almost more than any other.

“He lay on his bed.” Although this sentence is past tense, “laid” would be incorrect and suggests he was laying eggs.

“She sighed as she laid the visitors’ book beside the pen and lay back wondering if she would ever make an entry in it again.”

In present tense the sentence would read, “She sighs as she lays the visitors’ book beside the pen and lies back, wondering if she will ever make an entry in it again...

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Pairs/Groups Of Words Often Confused – Part 5 of 6

Words, Mistakes

Pairs/Groups Of Words Often Confused – Part 5 of 6

by: Laraine Anne Barker

PASSED, PAST

Passed is the past tense of pass. Past means a time that has gone.

“Time passed and we all forgot the incident.”

“In times past it was the custom for women to wear hats in church.”
PEACE, PIECE

Peace means the absence of war (or even noise); piece is a portion of something.
PEAK, PEEK, PIQUE

Pique means to excite or irritate; peek means to peep or snoop; peak as a noun means the summit or tip, and as a verb means to climax. So, you pique someone’s curiosity; you don’t peek or peak it. If someone annoys you, you become piqued rather than peeked or peaked.
PLAIN, PLANE

Plain means obvious, also unadorned or lacking in good looks; plane is a carpenter’s tool or an abbreviation of aeroplane.
PATIENCE, P...

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Pairs/Groups Of Words Often Confused – Part 3 of 6

Words, Mistakes

Pairs/Groups Of Words Often Confused – Part 3 of 6

by: Laraine Anne Barker

ELICIT, ILLICIT

Elicit means to extract or draw out; illicit means not legal.
EVERYONE, EVERY ONE

Everyone means every person in a group; every one means each person and is always followed by “of”.

“Everyone needs to know how to swim.”

“Every one of you should be able to swim.”

FAIR, FARE

Fair means average, good-looking, pale, unbiased (what a lot of meanings for one little word!); fare is the money you pay to go somewhere by bus, train, plane, taxi, etc. It can also refer to a passenger. As a verb it means do, as in:

“I didn’t fare as well in my exams this year as I’d hoped.”
FAZE, PHASE

The most common error is the use of phase when the writer means faze...

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